About Generation Power

Generation Power

The Indigenous Clean Energy Social Enterprise (ICE) has developed a training and career program for Indigenous youth in the clean energy sector! Generation Power is a holistic, capacity-based program that acknowledges the skills, talent and qualifications of youth and employers. 

It is modelled after successful Indigenous-led educational and training programs and focuses on collective learning through cohort-based instruction, peer-to-peer mentoring and on-the-land education.

Quote

"Considering the state of our world right now—the global pandemic, the climate crisis, and the need for Indigenous worldviews at the forefront of environmental transformation—the creation and implementation of this capacity-building program is timely.,” says Generation Power Program Manager Ricky-Lee Watts.

Gen Power Photo

Our Vision

Generation Power encourages Indigenous youth to explore careers in clean energy. It is also an essential piece of the clean energy landscape in Canada that nurtures the leadership potential of both Indigenous youth and energy sector employers to advance a sustainable and equitable energy future.

Embodying symbolism within each icon of the logo, the Thunderbird, Feather, Cycle of Life, Earth, and Lightning each represent an important part in the wholeness that is the vision of Generation Power. A vision for a future that inspires sustainability, equity, respect, and honours our shared interconnectedness.

Something special about this design, is it's interpretative nature that all relate to the same vision. Within its imagery, some ICE team members see the sun, a wind turbine, or roots of the Earth. What do you see?

Generation Power Logo

Hover over the logo for information.

Thunderbird

A representation of powerful spiritual vision, change and transformation.

Earth

The Earth encircles and is a part of all that we are. A representation of oneness, and reminder that we’re all interconnected in our experiences of live. hišukʔiš c̓awaak - everything is one.

Lightning

A representation of energy, electricity, and power. Illuminating the future of clean energy and destruction of unsustainable practices.

Feather

Guiding the vision of Generation Power, the feather represents trust, strength, wisdom and honour.

Cycle of Life

An embodiment of the medicine wheel, four directions, seasons and generations, this is an icon of renewal and holism.

Thunderbird

A representation of powerful spiritual vision, change and transformation.

Earth

The Earth encircles and is a part of all that we are. A representation of oneness, and reminder that we’re all interconnected in our experiences of live. hišukʔiš c̓awaak - everything is one.

Lightning

A representation of energy, electricity, and power. Illuminating the future of clean energy and destruction of unsustainable practices.

Feather

Guiding the vision of Generation Power, the feather represents trust, strength, wisdom and honour.

Cycle of Life

An embodiment of the medicine wheel, four directions, seasons and generations, this is an icon of renewal and holism.

Program Overview

Group Photograph at solar farm.

Generation Power engages both Indigenous youth and energy economy employers, positioning Indigenous leadership as an essential component of Canada’s clean energy transition. 

Taking a future-focused approach, the program introduces Indigenous youth to the growing clean energy economy in Canada and around the globe, and the broad range of existing and emerging energy careers. Employers — including project developers, utilities, non-profit organizations, communities and government — will gain an understanding of Indigenous youths' role in leading Canada’s energy future. 

Objectives

  • The program’s overarching objective is to enhance clean energy literacy among Indigenous youth participants and encourage energy employers to enhance their ability to attract and retain Indigenous talent. The program will provide a baseline understanding of current Indigenous leadership in Canada and look to the future to explore emerging markets, careers and opportunities. 

    Specifically, Indigenous youth participants will achieve the following objectives through completion of the program: 

    • Explore the range of careers available in the energy economy 
    • Gain exposure to clean energy projects through mentorship and an on-the-land learning camp 
    • Enhance understanding of the current and future energy landscape in Canada and globally 
    • Develop leadership and essential employability skills 
    • Leverage existing skills and experience to launch a career in the energy economy 
    • Build a network of support within ICE’s community 

    Objectives for employers who participate in the program include: 

    • Enhance understanding of their organization’s role in supporting Indigenous leadership in Canada’s energy future 
    • Develop the capacity to lead and contribute to more equitable and culturally aware workplaces 
    • Build the ability to attract and retain Indigenous talent 
    • Understand the need to attract and retain Indigenous talent for success in Canada’s energy future 
    • Build a network of support with ICE’s community

Impact

ICE expects the following long-term impacts to be achieved through successful implementation of this program over several years, recognizing that the program may be adapted to accommodate changes in the external environment (i.e. economic conditions and political support for energy transition efforts). Short-term, medium-term and long-term goals for each element of the program can be found in the logic model in Appendix A. 

  1. ICE and employment partners support the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, particularly call #92. 
  2. Indigenous youth are contributing to and shaping Canada’s energy future with more visibility and power. 
  3. Systemic barriers to participation in the energy economy that disadvantage Indigenous youth are dismantled and employers recognize the need to attract and retain Indigenous talent beyond corporate social responsibility. 
  4. Intergenerational collaboration is viewed by Indigenous groups and settler-Canadians as a necessary component of a sustainable energy future.

 

The Team

Ricky-Lee

Ricky-Lee

Generation Power Program Manager

Ricky-Lee is Huupač̓asatḥ, Ḥuučuqƛisʔatḥ, Nuučaan̓uł through his mother’s ancestry. His father’s ancestry is a mystery. He has a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of Victoria and is a confident communicator who leads with determination, curiosity, compassion, humility, and gratitude.


With experience working with Indigenous communities, universities, government, and with a growing involvement in entrepreneurship, public speaking, traveling, and leadership, Ricky-Lee lives a life of interconnectedness and intentionality.


He inspires people to step into their power and to serve as role models for younger generations.
Stemming from Nuučaan̓uł roots and teachings, Ricky-Lee’s vision embraces values of ʔiisaak and hišukʔiš c̓awaak — respect for all creation having a common origin, and that everything is one.

Layane

Layane

Generation Power Program Coordinator

Layane is originally from Brazil and she is currently based in Vancouver, on the traditional territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh.


Layane has a Master of Sustainable Environmental Management from the University of Saskatchewan. Her master’s research focused on developing tools and resources for renewable energy and energy efficiency education in Indigenous communities. Layane is passionate about clean energy technologies as well as community building and engagement. By participating in the development of clean energy programs in Indigenous communities, Layane feels that her work is making a difference in her surrounding environment. In her spare time, she likes to binge-watch history and nature documentaries.

Eryn

Eryn

Managing Director

Eryn acknowledges, with gratitude, the territories of the Erie, Neutral, Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Mississaugas (Hamilton, Ontario) where she grew up. She is also thankful to the Anishinaabe people whose unceded, unsurrendered territory she lives and works in.

Eryn developed and leads the 20/20 Catalysts Program, ICE’s keystone initiative and Canada’s first Indigenous clean energy capacity-building program. In just five years it has supported over 100 Indigenous clean energy champions on their energy journeys. As Managing Director, she also oversees many of ICE’s capacity-building programs.

In her current role, much of Eryn’s work focuses on supporting community energy planning and energy education initiatives in northern communities.

In 2017, Eryn was one of twenty emerging leaders selected by the Arctic Council to take part in the Arctic Remote Energy Network Academy. In 2018, she was honoured with distinction as a 30 under 30 in sustainability and was also awarded the University of Waterloo’s Young Alumni Inspiration Award in 2020. Eryn recently authored Arctic Community Energy Planning and Implementation Toolkit, in partnership with Gwich’in Council International for communities across the circumpolar Arctic.

One of Eryn’s passions is women’s leadership in the clean energy sector. She specifically strives for the advancement of Indigenous women in the sector.